Origin of the Bible

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Dead Sea Scrolls Bible (incomplete)
Some copies do not fall into any of the old, familiar categories — agreeing with either MT, SP, or LXX — and chart a different course textually.

The Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a series of twelve caves around various sites near the Dead Sea in the West Bank (then part of Jordan) between 1946 and 1956 by Bedouin shepherds and a team of archeologists. The practice of storing worn-out sacred manuscripts in earthenware vessels buried in the earth or within caves is related to the ancient Jewish custom of Genizah.

Owing to the poor condition of some of the scrolls, scholars have not identified all of their texts. The identified texts fall into three general groups:

(a) About 40% are copies of texts from the Hebrew Scriptures.

(b) Approximately another 30% are texts from the Second Temple Period which ultimately were not canonized in the Hebrew Bible, like the Book of Enoch, the Book of Jubilees, the Book of Tobit, the Wisdom of Sirach, Psalms 152–155, etc.

(c) The remainder (roughly 30%) are sectarian manuscripts of previously unknown documents that shed light on the rules and beliefs of a particular group (sect) or groups within greater Judaism, like the Community Rule, the War Scroll, the Pesher on Habakkuk, and The Rule of the Blessing.

~ by Joel Huan on June 18, 2019.

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